Independent Quebec, An

The past, the present and the future

Livre numérique

Independent Quebec, An

For the first time, Jacques Parizeau shares his views on Quebec's recent history and its future. As chief economics advisor to Quebec premiers in the 1960s, Jacques Parizeau was instrumental in bringing about Quebe's Quiet Revolution. As René Lévesque's Finance Minister from 1976 through 1984, he showed that sovereigntists could govern Quebec and ensure economic viability. As Premier, he brought Quebec close to sovereignty in the 1995 referendum. In 2010, he still represents an idea shared by millions in Quebec. Drawing on his rich experience in public service and teaching, Jacques Parizeau explains how the idea of an independent Quebec took root and evolved. He examines Quebec's current economic, political, social and cultural situation, and reviews options for future development. No stones are left unturned. Why become independent? What is the role of the State and how should it be administered in a globalized economy. What are the challenges in the 21st century? What about the financial crisis? And the environment? And above all what challenges face Quebec sovereigntists and their English Canadian counterparts?

Table des matières

Table des matières
Independent Quebec, An 1
TABLE OF CONTENTS 9
FOREWORD 13
INTRODUCTION 15
Renewing ideas 16
The state and globalization 18
Sovereignty is necessary 20
Political and administrative dysfunction 21
Words matter / The referendums of 1980, 1995 and 201 24
What next? The idea, the Constitution, international relations / Is an independent Quebec viable? 25
How will it all work? 26
Chapter 1 / PHASE ONE: NEGOTIATING SOVEREIGNTY-ASSOCIATION / Trying independence 27
The threat of isolation 30
Holding power 34
Preparing for sovereignty-association 35
The 1980 referendum 38
Lessons learned 40
Chapter 2 / PHASE 2: ACHIEVING SOVEREIGNTY 43
More and more countries 44
Small countries with large markets 45
Free trade between Canada and the United States 47
The American protector 49
Partnership 51
The Canadian dollar 52
The French-speaking population has to decide 53
Negotiations with Aboriginal peoples 55
International recognition 57
Territorial integrity: behind the scenes 58
Conclusion 61
Chapter 3 / GLOBALIZATION AND PROTECTING CITIZENS 63
The new world of communications / The free-trade revolution 65
Revisiting the ruins 66
Organizing the world 68
Defending small countries 69
Out of WTO reach 71
Business versus government 74
Quebec and the next bid for sovereignty 76
Chapter 4 / SOVEREIGNTY AND PUBLIC OPINION / Fear and good government 81
The Bloc Québécois poll 82
Special status 83
It's realistic, it can be done but will it happen? 85
Looking back 87
Voter wisdom 89
Age distinctions in voting patterns change 90
Chapter 5 / CONSTITUTIONAL ILLUSIONS 93
Which government is the real one? 94
The beautiful risk 95
Meech 97
The Bélanger-Campeau Commission 99
Charlottetown 101
Zero deficit 103
Sponsorship scandals 105
The Supreme Court and clarity 107
Chapter 6 / THE INTERNATIONAL OUTLOOK 111
Messrs Sarkozy and Desmarais 113
If quotes could kill 115
Powerful offstage interests 118
France is still there 119
Relations with American states 120
Humanitarian aid 123
Chapter 7 / IS AN INDEPENDENT QUEBEC VIABLE? 125
Accounting studies: Bélanger-Campeau 126
The Restructuration ministry's accounting studies 128
François Legault's accounting studies 129
Expansion or decline? The Lucids 132
Predicting the future is never easy 134
Stabilizing public finances 136
The accounting rules mess 137
Debate on the debt 139
Comparisons with the OECD: Quebec is normal 141
Chapter 8 / THE QUEBEC STATE 143
What type of political system? 144
Proportional representation 145
An upper house? Representing regions? 147
The temptation to centralize 150
What to decentralize? 151
Cities or regions? 153
What powers for the regions? 155
A clear-cut Constitution 156
Chapter 9 / THE SECRET OF GROWTH 159
Productivity 160
Innovation 162
Anesthesia 164
Progress in research and development 165
Intervention is necessary 166
You can't tell the carpenter by the toolbox 168
Trading off between provinces 169
Desperately seeking real government 172
Education and economic growth 174
Regional universities 176
Chapter 10 / THE STATE AND CORPORATIONS: THE GREAT DEBATE / Leave it to the government 179
Quebec society and business 180
Maîtres chez nous (Masters in our own house) / An inalienable financial system 183
Supporting the garde montante (the rising generation) 186
Obstacles: income taxes and the public 191
The importance of decision-making centres 192
The responsibility of the Caisse de dépôt et placement 193
The Caisse de dépôt et placement in an independent Quebec 196
Chapter 11 / THE STATE AND THE CITIZEN (PART 1) 199
Training, taxation, language and environment 200
Workforce flexibility and worker protection 201
Dysfunction and waste 203
Vocational training 204
Minimal requirements 205
Taxes and redistribution 206
Quebec is not fiscal hell 207
Sources of injustice: taxes on profits 209
Sources of injustice: tax havens 212
Bank secrecy 213
Chapter 12 / THE STATE AND THE CITIZEN (PART 2) 215
Live and work in French, but also use English 216
The language imbroglio 217
The achievements of Bill 101 218
Being part of North America 219
Until the national question is settled 221
Climate change: the top priority 222
Kyoto 223
Politicians tail public opinion 225
Quebec gets involved 226
Environment prevails over the WTO 229
CONCLUSION / A technician's viewpoint 231
The identity problem 232
A few clear ideas 233
Translating values into projects 234
People need to know 236
Appendix I / STATEMENTS BY JACQUES CHIRAC,PRESIDENT OF FRANCE,AND BILL CLINTON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, BEFORE THE 1995 REFERENDUM 237
Appendix II / DISINFORMATION 239
INDEX OF PROPER NAMES 241